Publishers give BM some green love

April 15, 2008

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In partnership with Eco-libris (http://www.ecolibris.net), and in celebration of Earth Day, several book publishers are donating copies of new books to BookMooch. They want to do something “green” as well as to give book trading a try. Also, every book sent out will have an Eco-Libris sticker on it, so each book represents on newly planted tree.

Every day from now until Earth Day, I will publicize a new green-related book. The publishers are sending the copies themselves to the people who mooch them, so they really are making a gift. Eco-libris is coordinating the whole thing, so you’ll be mooching from them.

Let’s thank the publishers for their generosity. I have a few suggestions:

1) mooch the book, read it, and then pass it on to someone else by re-listing it on BookMooch. This is about reuse, and the power of book trading to lessen the number of trees felled to reach an audience.

2) leave your comments, reviews, ie on the BookMooch page for each book, but also on each book’s amazon page. That’ll help the publisher sell more copies, and help them see that helping book trading can help their goals too

3) blog, blog, blog about the book, the publisher’s gift, and give your encouragement of this

4) mention book trading to your friends both in person, and in the online forums you participate in

5) help out Eco-libris for coordinating this whole thing. Read about them and their tree-planting efforts and consider buying some planted-tree-stickers from them.


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Tuesday’s (Earth day) book is “Big Green Purse: Use Your Spending Power to Create a Cleaner, Greener World “, by Diane MacEachern.

This is the last book in this weeklong promotion. Thanks for mooching, and when you receive one of these books, be sure to re-list it once you’ve finished reading it. Lots of people want to read them!

Direct links:

  • Book detail page
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    Here is a short description of the book:

    “Protecting our environment is one of the biggest issues facing our planet today. But how do we solve a problem that can seem overwhelming-even hopeless? As Diane MacEachern argues in Big Green Purse, the best way to fight the industries that pollute the planet, thereby changing the marketplace forever, is to mobilize the most powerful consumer force in the world-women.

    MacEachern’s message is simple but revolutionary. If women harness the “power of their purse” and intentionally shift their spending money to commodities that have the greatest environmental benefit, they can create a cleaner, greener world. Spirited and informative, this book:

    – targets twenty commodities-cars, cosmetics, coffee, food, paper products, appliances, cleansers, and more-where women’s dollars can make a dramatic difference;
    – provides easy-to-follow guidelines and lists so women can choose the greenest option regardless of what they’re buying, along with recommended companies they should support;
    – encourages women to spend wisely by explaining what’s worth the premium price some green products cost, what’s not, and when they shouldn’t spend money at all; and
    – differentiates between products that are actually “green” and those that are simply marketed as “ecofriendly.”

    Whether readers want to start with small changes or are ready to devote the majority of their budget to green products, MacEachern offers concrete and immediate ways that women can take action and make a difference. Empowering and enlightening, Big Green Purse will become the “green shopping bible” for women everywhere who are asking, “What can I do?” “



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    Monday’s book is “The Green Eaters – A Dream Comes True”, by Jennifer Murphy (Author), Mary Deaton (Illustrator).

    The publisher has made 5 copies available. Those will go quickly, so please put this book on your wishlist, so you can get it after someone else is done with it:

    Direct links:

  • Book detail page
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    Here is a short description of the book:

    “A fun and heart warming picture book for babies and young children that tells the story of five farm animal friends who dream of a better life outside of Dreary Day factory farm. They dream of a better future and one day they are moved to an organic farm. They are amazed and delighted by what they find at The Green Eaters Farm. They realize this new home is where their dream comes true! A fun and friendly way to introduce the importance of organic living to children!.”



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    Sunday’s book is “Chance Murphy and the Battle of Morganville”, by Josh P. McClary.

    The publisher has made 5 copies available. Those will go quickly, so please put this book on your wishlist, so you can get it after someone else is done with it:

    Direct links:

  • Book detail page
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    Here is a short description of the book:

    “Chance Murphy, a 13-year-old living in Morganville, Indiana during the mid 1980s, is full of contradictions. He wants to be a man, but he has the needs of a child; he loves his mentally handicapped sister, but he also resents her and wishes she weren’t such an easy target for the other kids; he is witty, but he embarrasses easily, especially when it comes to dealing with his emerging sexual feelings. Though Chance has a big heart, he has a dark side that surfaces in dreams of nuclear obliteration and manifests into paranoia and an “enemies list”—at the top of which is his archenemy, Otto Manheim, the neighborhood kid. While the tension between the two creates many comical moments, the conflict escalates and finally reaches a boiling point at the bloody battle of Morganville.”



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    Saturday’s book is “Growing Toward Balance: Achievable Ideas for Bringing Harmony to Your Mind, Body, and Spirit”, by Mary Kearns.

    The publisher has made 5 copies available. Those will go quickly, so please put this book on your wishlist, so you can get it after someone else is done with it:

    Direct links:

  • Book detail page
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    Here is a short description of the book:

    “To live your best, it’s important to strive for wellness and balance in every aspect of your life by coordinating your conscious mind with your body and spirit. Drawing from her experience as a workshop facilitator, researcher, and life coach, author Mary Kearns, PhD, brings a reader-friendly approach to a variety of topics supporting body-mind-spirit wellness.

    Growing Toward Balance promotes a holistic method of self-improvement, adopting the notion that who we are, how we feel, and what we accomplish are all intricately entwined. Combining coaching-style self-questioning, teachings from classic spiritual texts, and research-based suggestions for practical ways to implement positive change, this guide will help you take tangible steps to improve your well-being on every level.

    Rather than just offering advice, Growing Toward Balance provides more than eighty easy steps you can take to reach your own personal best, and offers exercises and activities to aid you in achieving greater balance and wellness. Kearns invites you to engage in a process of thinking about your mental, physical, and spiritual health and gives you simple, practical tools to achieve harmony in your life.”



    41Gg6J98Etl. Ss500
    Friday’s book is “Harmonious Environment: Beautify, Detoxify and Energize Your Life, Your Home and Your Planet”, by Norma Lehmeier-Hartie.

    The publisher has made 5 copies available. Those will go quickly, so please put this book on your wishlist, so you can get it after someone else is done with it:

    Direct links:

  • Book detail page
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    Here is a short description of the book:

    Shows the reader how to create a beautiful, non-toxic and natural home and workspace; a sanctuary that will support, invigorate and nourish them to enable the reader to flourish in all aspects of their lives–while being kind to the environment. There are hundreds of resources and information providing eco-friendly and safe construction and building materials and household goods. Clearly written, cleanly organized, and enthusiastically presented, this is an unusual and eclectic addition to anyone’ss home improvement library. Perfect blend of the practical and the magical to help us recapture the simplicity that modern society has stolen away.”


    Thursday has two books is “A Hot Planet Needs Cool Kids (Understanding Climate Change and What You Can Do About It)”, by Julie Hall, and “Here, There, and Everywhere” by Mira Tweti.

    The publisher has made 5 copies available of each. Those will go quickly, so please put this book on your wishlist, so you can get it after someone else is done with it:

    Direct links for “A Hot Planet…”

  • Book detail page
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    and for “Here, There, and Everywhere”

  • Book detail page
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book (Hot Planet and Here, There, and Everywhere) once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    41Cqxdl0Ftl. Sl500
    Here is a short description of “Mira Tweti : Here, There, and Everywhere”:

    Mira Tweti and Lisa Brady have produced a masterpiece for children, combining factual information and animal welfare issues with storytelling and fabulous ilustrations. Here, There and Everywhere takes us on a fascinating journey. Parents and teachers will learn as much as children and be just as enchanted.

    I highly recommend this book as a gift, as a necessary addition to libraries, and in schools and homes. Please share your copy with as many friends as you can, and encourage them to buy their own! –Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE – Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute & UN Messenger of Peace.”

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    and here is a short description of “Mira Tweti : Here, There, and Everywhere”:

    Kids, parents, and teachers will find the very latest information about the causes and effects of climate change, how people are working to reduce it, and ways kids and their families and schools can join the fight. A Hot Planet Needs Cool Kids teaches and inspires through clear and accessible writing, engaging illustrations, hands-on activities, cool and hot facts, eco-hero features, and a hopeful and empowering message to get kids involved in confronting global warming and developing their best selves through such work.

    A Hot Planet Needs Cool Kids is suitable for home and classroom use. It meets national science and social studies curriculum standards. Additional teacher resources are available. “



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    Wednesday’s book is “The Ovum Facto”, by Marvin L. Zimmerman.

    The publisher has made 5 copies available. Those will go quickly, so please put this book on your wishlist, so you can get it after someone else is done with it:

    Direct links:

  • Book detail page
  • Mooch this book
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    Here is a short description of the book:

    David Rose, a young investment banker from New York, becomes swept up in a whirlwind of international espionage, assassination, and sabotage. David finds himself on a journey that takes him to the unexplored depths of the Amazon in order to fulfill two ancient prophecies for saving mankind and at the same time to realize his own destiny. “


    Santag
    Tuesday’s book is When “Santa Turned Green”, by Victoria Perla (Author), Mirna Kantarevic (Illustrator).

    The publisher has made 5 copies available. Those will go quickly, so please put this book on your wishlist, so you can get it after someone else is done with it:

    Direct links:

  • Book detail page
  • Mooch this book
  • Add this book to your wishlist
  • Amazon info page

    Please leave comments on the Amazon info page for this book once you read the book. You can also buy a copy from Amazon, if you’d rather not pass the book onto someone else after mooching it.

    Here is a short description of the book:

    It’s November up in the North Pole. Everything’s going along smoothly at Santa’s workshop until he discovers a leak in his roof. Santa soon learns that this little leak is connected to a far bigger problem. The North Pole is melting because of something called global warming! Faced with the reality of what this could mean for Christmas, not to mention the planet and the future, Santa is determined to turn things around. To do so, he calls upon the people he knows better than any other–the children. Much to Santa’s joy, they respond in a way that makes all the difference…in the world.
  • 28 Responses to “Publishers give BM some green love”

    1. Greg A said

      Could Eco-Libris (http://bookmooch.com/m/bio/ecolibris) clarify if they are willing to send abroad?

    2. Wyndy said

      What a wonderful idea. Kudos to Ecolibris and participating publishers!

    3. Mark Williams said

      Fantastic idea. The review copy program at Librarything has grown very rapidily — glad the publishers have finally caught on to us too 🙂

    4. Carly said

      My favorite part of bookmooch is that I frequently use other people’s packaging when I send books out. Bookmooch is recycling through and through!

    5. Could Eco-Libris (http://bookmooch.com/m/bio/ecolibris) clarify if they are willing to send abroad?

      They will send their stickers abroad, but the books in this partnership, because they’re being sent by USA publishers, are to US addresses only. However, I’m hoping that the first person to receive the book is only the first step, and that the same copy will get passed around, moving its way out of the USA.

    6. Kathleen said

      Sounds like more of what sites like this are all about. Will be looking for these pass-along books. I’m in for the long haul. K

    7. cvalda said

      Bookmooch is recycling through and through!

      …while burning absurd amounts of carbon in transport! Especially international mooches, which use the fastest growing source of emissions in the transport sector. I like BookMooch, but it’s a pretty decadent variant on recycling.

    8. Hercules40 said

      I am so glad for this John. I have a friend over at a Publishing house in NYC. Do you think I should e-mail him and ask him if they are willing to join the Earth “Green Day” give-a-way started here?

      Personally, I will participate, and send the book overseas!

    9. Leah said

      What a marvelous and generous gift. John, you just do good deeds everywhere you turn. Bless you!
      Leah

    10. Mark Williams said

      “Bookmooch is recycling through and through!

      …while burning absurd amounts of carbon in transport! Especially international mooches, which use the fastest growing source of emissions in the transport sector. I like BookMooch, but it’s a pretty decadent variant on recycling.

      Not at all. When you look at the resources used to produce books (and waste generated from the dyes and inks), re-using books is definitely a a sound ecological choice.

      Are you under the impression that separate flights are chartered by the USPS and others (Fed Ex might do so, but they are not used here as the cost is much greater)? Not so, the mail is packed in the cargo holds of passenger flights.

      We’ve discussed the use of re-using packing materials (often recycled to begin with) as well, and many do so on Bookmooch.

    11. cvalda said

      Are you under the impression that separate flights are chartered by the USPS and others (Fed Ex might do so, but they are not used here as the cost is much greater)? Not so, the mail is packed in the cargo holds of passenger flights.

      Still reliant on air transport; it adds to the demand for it. Second-hand goods are a plus, but export of any goods involves carbon emission, and most of our industries rely on this. Hence local production.

      So, it’s not the kind of fundamental restructure required to reduce emissions in a big way, it’s a pleasant half-measure.

      I like second-hand books, but this is probably the least environmentally friendly way of getting one.

    12. Mark Williams said

      “Still reliant on air transport; it adds to the demand for it. Second-hand goods are a plus, but export of any goods involves carbon emission, and most of our industries rely on this. Hence local production.

      So, it’s not the kind of fundamental restructure required to reduce emissions in a big way, it’s a pleasant half-measure.

      I like second-hand books, but this is probably the least environmentally friendly way of getting one.”

      ———————-

      Glad to have a friendly discussion of this here (again); I think it is a topic many of us care deeply about here.

      Think of it this way:

      Option one: Buy book new — a.) book is manufactured with raw materials with all the fuel costs, resource use and pollution resulting. b.) book is shipped from place of manufacturer to publisher. c.) book is shipped from publisher to wholesale distributor d.) book is shipped to retail outlet or online outlet e.) book is shipped to customer (if Amazon or online retailer) or picked up from store.

      Each of the above hops could well be many, many miles, quite often across borders, so taken together the carbon footprint is quite significant. Although it could be argued of greater benefit to society (as books so often work towards education/literacy), than the vast majority of much heavier shipped good such as say… bottled water 🙂

      Option two: Buy book used — a.) book is no longer discarded (for a while at least), and in many (but not all cases) the above is avoided as a new book is not purchased. b.) shipment of book from online outlet (or Bookmooch). Just a single shipment in place of the many as listed for new books.

      Yes, it would be more ecologically pure to buy used books locally; however, sadly, many used book stores have closed in the U.S. and beyond, libraries are having difficulty handling and selling donated books and even more difficulty in stocking their own shelves, and, of course, many live in remote areas without access such options.

      I am mainly responding to the notion that mooched books require more air transport (and thus have a larger carbon foot print) than other options, so this is most relevant to international trades, which in many cases involve books not locally available to those who mooch them. I’ve lived in both Europe and Australia and can attest to the difficulty of finding used books in both places. Further, as mentioned, these are not separate flights, but the mail is added to passenger flights (for USPS air mail). The vast majority of books traded domestically on BM are not sent via air.

      I’ve run a university book trading group for several years before coming to Bookmooch and we’ve had several environmental economists and scholars in related fields in our group — they certainly held the firm conviction that the trading of used books is a significantly greener method of attaining books in comparison to the purchase of new books, but, of course, is less clearly efficient when compared with buying used books locally for those of us who might have access to them, which would generally only be those who live near major urban centers or college towns.

    13. cvalda said

      I am mainly responding to the notion that mooched books require more air transport (and thus have a larger carbon foot print) than other options

      Not additional planes per se, but additional demand in a growing industry. And transport generally is a significant bulk of global emissions.

      Yes, it would be more ecologically pure to buy used books locally; however, sadly, many used book stores have closed in the U.S. and beyond, libraries are having difficulty handling and selling donated books and even more difficulty in stocking their own shelves, and, of course, many live in remote areas without access such options.

      This makes sense. Very much in love with Book Towns ( http://www.booktown.net/gi.asp ) but you’ve got to have resources and a motivated community to pull that off. As a Kiwi I was kinda taken aback to see US public libraries using BookMooch.

      But outside the charity function, BookMooch rewards access – you need books for points.

      It plays into current Western reliance on carbon in allocating resources, and this allocation doesn’t occur primarily according to need.

      So pretty much, I think its flaws demonstrate flaws in industrial capitalism. It reduces one aspect of production, but distribution
      is stratified and relies on carbon emission.

      There are definite positives, but the negatives are huge. The sort of carbon rationing that’s required wouldn’t sit well with BookMooch.

      I’d argue it’s a good idea (second-hand book exchange on a large scale) requiring alteration.

    14. Michelle (AU) said

      Thanks Mark for sticking up for BM.
      To the detractors and those bashing up BM,
      “Love it or leave it!” M

    15. Kathleen said

      Well said, Mark. I try to recycle everything, where possible, combine tasks when outing and plan ahead when routing. Not perfect, but doing what I can, where I can. The mantra in this house is ‘if you can’t use it twice, don’t use it once’. There are some few obvious exceptions to that 🙂

    16. Billie said

      Not to sound trite but we have feet therefore we will leave footprints. It is the choices that me make that make the difference. I am new here on BookMooch but one of the criteria I have here as well as if I order a used book from Amazon is to look for the person who is the closest to my location to order from. This is two fold. Less transportation needed and I also get what I want faster.

      Unlike using a farmers market most books are not produced locally and already have a hefty carbon print by the time the get to my local bookstore. The only other option is e-books but hey there is that nasty thing called electicity that also has its own issues. All we can do is do what we can. I like what Kathleen said. “If you can’t use it twice don’t use it once.”

    17. Cece said

      I’m sharing books instead of buying new and filling landfills. I reuse the packaging and walk to the post office. The plane is going anyway-the mail in the hold isn’t the reason for the flight. I connect in a postive way with people on the other side of the world.
      I WAS feeling pretty good about this process.

    18. caitlin said

      Michelle, please, they were having a very polite and informative discussion. Telling someone to ‘love it or leave it’ doesn’t solve anything. cvalda did say she (he? sorry) likes Bookmooch – she’s just pointing out what she percieves to be a flaw. Nothing would ever get better if the people who didn’t like the status quo just got up and left.

    19. Jackie N. said

      Bookmooch saves trees. Reuse packaging as much as feasible. It helps keep the postal employees busy. It keeps people reading instead of watching the boob tube. Let’s think of more reasons.

    20. Andreea said

      I agree with cvalda that “there are definite positives” about BM, but that they come with negatives. It cannot be otherwise when it has to rely on structures developed by/through capitalism, where the ultimate is always profits.

      It is true that the plane would fly anyway with or without the BM book, but it would do so only because a large number of people around the world – who can all use the same argument – have bought tickets or sent mail. I cannot stop the plane or influence all those people, but I can and must take responsibility for my own individual decision to mooch or send a book/buy a ticket.

    21. Hi All – According to the recent ‘Environmental Trends and Climate Impacts:Findings from the U.S. Book Industry’, the usage of paper in books is by far the #1 environmental impact of books on this planet. Paper usage constitutes of over 70% of the emissions of the book industry. BookMooch helps address this issue by promoting re-use of books, so personally I believe the overall impact of mooching is positive, although only a real audit can ascertain. Not to say that energy usage for transportation is not important and should not be addressed, only that in this particular context, tree based paper is a more major concern.

      For more information:
      http://ecolibris.blogspot.com/2008/04/how-green-is-book-publishing-industry_12.html

      When I mooch I almost always go for the nearest possible person. I think the only time I chose a farther one was when the nearest one was “possibly inactive” or something like that. If I can arrange to meet in person instead of using postage, even better!

      Eylon @ Eco-Libris

    22. Amtep said

      Am I the only one who assumed that “Publishers give BM some green love” meant that BM would be getting lots and lots of fresh green dollars? 🙂

    23. Nancy said

      I am so over the whole carbon footprint crap. How about we quit bulldozing acres of land to build yet another strip mall? I operate under the reduce, reuse, recycle goal. Bookmooch embraces that goal. I send internationally. I can’t imagine being in a foreign country trying to find books in another language, much less books I want to read. I however, refuse to get caught up in the propaganda of green. Please don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater.

    24. Jackie N. said

      Speaking of libraries…the main reason I love bookmooch so much is because I have come to hate public libraries. I started checking out books from the library at a very young age. I’ve always loved to read. Over the years I have paid my share of overdue book fines, but the last time was the straw that broke the camel’s back. My grandkids and I checked out seven preschool books which got forgotten…in an obscure bookcase for about 4 or 5 weeks after they were read. For some reason, I was not notified by the library and when I discovered the books, I immediately took them back and dropped them in the book chute, because the library was closed. It was not until six months later I visited the library and they told me I had $35 in fines from those 7 little books. I said NO WAY and I’ve never been back. I always buy used books, never new ones.

    25. “If you can’t use it twice don’t use it once.”

      Remind me not to use your bathroom 🙂

    26. Wanda said

      Bookmooch is STILL more ecofriendly than a new book. If you buy a brand new book AND have it shipped, common sense will tell you that we are still using less resources. Not to mention, we mooch books that are out of print so the educational and fun factor there is PRICELESS. It still costs less if an airplane or truck is full of books than if we each get into our own cars and drive to the store, etc for one book. Not to mention, I live in a rural area and have to drive 45 minutes to the nearest large bookstore. While I recycle and am careful, I am not a green fanatic. Who are we saving the planet for, anyway? If no one can use anything, there will be no one left here to save the planet FOR!

    27. Cynthia said

      As the daughter of a paper company executive, trees are a renewable resource.

    28. Some long term goals for BookMooch which touch on the eco-issues are:

      1) make book trading so effective that publishers can print fewer copies of a book, and yet reach a larger audience. (to accomplish this, I have to find a way for publishers to profit from BM)

      2) promote “meet & mooch” get-togethers, where people regularly meet and bring books the others attending indicated an interest in, so that books can be felt, scanned, and mooched in person.

      3) provide a “mooch shelf” where books being traded can be dropped off and picked up at your leisure (and safely) in a place you’re already driving by. These could be at libraries, schools and cafes.

      4) encourage multi-mooching, i.e. getting several books from one person. This lowers postal costs and the carbon footprint per book.

      and more ideas in the future…

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